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How To Make Healthier Homemade Pizza Dough From Scratch | goop Test Kitchen


Best thing about pizza
dough and bread making is it’s awesome workout. Anyone out there that’s looking to get a
shred as I am, joking, make pizza and eat lots of pizza. (upbeat music) My name is David Nayfeld’s
from Che Fico in San Francisco. Today we’re going to be
gooping our pizza dough. What that means to me is
ultimately just making your pizza much more nutritious and also digestible. The way we’re doing that is
we’re focusing on using some more whole wheat flowers. Also, we’re using a sourdough starter. why that’s important to us is because using a natural
starter rather than using something that you buy at the store is because the pizza goes
through a longer fermentation, it has a chance to develop. Also, some of the gases get baked out. What that ends up doing is it makes you be able to digest the pizza more. Also, what it’s going to do is it’s going to have a much
more pronounced flavor. So, I’m going to show you
guys how to get together a nice sourdough pizza that
you can even do in your house. Whether you’re doing it
in a wood fire pizza oven like we are or whether
you doing it on your grill on a piece stoner in your oven. So, check out the recipe below
for our gooped pizza dough. And while you’re at it, let’s make sure that you’re subscribing to goop’s YouTube channel for all sorts of really great content. So, we’re going to get started here. We’re using a type
eighty-five red flour from Central Milling, which we feel has a lot more flavor and it’s also has many more nutrients than your standard overly
bleached, all purpose flour. And you want to use fresh stuff, so try not to buy too much more flour than you’re going to be
using in any given time. Usually by today’s standards, you’re going to to be able
to find really nice flour in most of your kind of specialty stores. Also, you can buy this stuff online. So we have our flour here, we have our salt, we use a nice kosher salt, I really suggest you don’t
use an iodized table salt, but if you’re going to use
something like a sea salt, expect there to be some small variations in the way that you ferment your pizza because the salt ultimately will slow down your fermentation. So, here we have a dietetic small powder. Now, what that’s good for is that’s going to create
a little bit of food for your sourdough while it’s developing. Also, what it’s going to
do is it’s going to create a little bit of beautiful color in the dough, it’s going to create some structure and it’s also going to start creating a little bit of that
ideal sourdough flavor. And so, once we have that in here, we’re going to go ahead and
put our bowl in our mixer. We got our dough hook. First thing we’re going to do is we’re going to measure
out our sourdough starter from our kind of bulk amount here. The great thing about sourdough
starters is can use some and then you just re-feed it and it grows and grows and grows. And if you keep your
sourdough starter alive and you keep it healthy, it’s always going to be around for you. Sourdough starters are great for pancakes, are great for waffles. They’re great for making
your own bread at home. Obviously, they’re great for pizza. What you’re looking for here is you have a really really
beautiful sour smell. Nothing too acidic, you
know, the lactic acid is really the predominant flavor. You don’t have a lot of citric acid which is a more of sour
kind of vinegary flavor and you can see the bubbles
inside the jar there which are showing you that
it’s nice and it’s alive. This part is the fun part. If you have any kids at home, make sure that you get
them involved with this ’cause all the kids love to get their hands dirty in this part. To make your own
sourdough starter at home. It takes a few days and you really have to develop
a relationship with it. But if you don’t have the time to do this, check out your local bakery. Bakers are going to be super excited that you’re trying to
make something at home and they’re going to be
really pleased to help you out in any way they can. (upbeat music)
Oh, its alive, I’m just going to wash
my hands real quick. What we’re going to do now is we’re going to take
our sourdough starter and we’re going to get
it put into ice water. What that’s going to do is it’s
going to control the temperature What that’s going to do
is it’s going to control the temperature as it goes into the bowl
with the dry ingredients. We have our extra virgin olive oil, really try to make sure
that you get a really good extra virgin olive oil because ultimately it’s not
going to have the same flavor. The nutritional aspect is
obviously key for us at Che Fico and the pizza that we make there, which is why we think
it’s a great fit for Goop. which is why we think
it’s a great fit for goop. we’re going to add them to the bowl with our dry ingredients. We’re going to start on speed one, which sometimes is called stir. That way, we’re not getting
a bunch of the flour and the ingredients splashing out as they start to integrate together. So, we’re going to
slowly add wet ingredient to the dry with the ice. (stirring) So, now that we have that in, we’re going to put a
timer on for two minutes. Then now that the first
two minutes of mixing is done on speed one, we’re going to bring the bowl down and we’re just going to scrape anything that’s left over on the edge. And you just want to make sure that you scrape it off the hook. These little tools right
here is a pastry dough card. It’s great for scraping bowls. So, now we’re going to go on speed two, and we’re going to do it
for another two minutes. We’re going to go ahead and
start our timer for that and we’ll come back to it. (stirring) So, now that we’re done
with speed number two, we’re going to take a look, it doesn’t necessarily need to be scraped down too
much as you’re noticing. If the dough is really
climbing up your hook, you can scrape it down again, but at this point we’re looking good. So, what we’re going to do is we’re going to go to speed number
three for about six minutes. we’re going to go to speed
number three for about six minutes. Now, the dough is starting to slap around the bowl here, right? And it’s coming away from itself. What you’re going to notice is as the dough goes further
and further and further it’s going to keep
slapping around the sides, it’s not going to stick
anymore to the bowl, and the dough will make
its way down the hook. Now that’s a great sign
that means that the dough is becoming more of a united form, right? The glue elasticity is
starting to be created. So, at this point, you
really want to make sure that your dough is not overheating. Whatever you do when
you’re mixing your dough, do not try and touch the dough
while the mixer is going. If you need to touch
the dough for any reason to stop it for a second, touch it, check out where it’s at. Right now we’re at 69 degrees Right now we’re at sixty-nine degrees which is fine. What happens when the heat
goes above 75 to 77 degrees What happens when the heat
goes above seventy-five to seventy-seven degrees So, you really want to keep it below and if it’s getting a little hot, you can go ahead and put
the dough back in the fridge for about two 30 minutes and
then get it back in the mixer. for about two thirty
minutes and then get it back in the mixer. we’re going to be going to speed
number four for 12 minutes. we’re going to be going to speed number four for twelve minutes. So, you’ll notice that your dough is really starting to get worked
really, really strong here. So, the key is making sure
that your dough doesn’t start to tear apart too much, right? That is an indicator obvious that your dough might be
getting a little bit to work because of the heat or the friction. Right now the dough is
looking beautiful and smooth. We’re almost going to be done with our mix and then we’re going to go
to our rest and cold portion. The temperature is now 73 degrees, The temperature is now
seventy-three degrees, and start resting for the next step. Now, what we’re going to do is
we’re going to get our dough out. Now, what we’re going to
do is we’re going to get our dough out. If you make your dough properly, your hook should come off clean and your hands should be
relatively clean as well. We’re going to transfer
this into another bowl. At this point, you’re going to
want to cover it with something. At this point, you’re going to want to cover it with something. ’cause obviously there’s enough plastic floating around the earth for a lifetime. So you can go ahead and just
use a towel if you’d like to cover it up. Get your towel underneath your bowl. Try to get as secure as you can. Moving forward, what we can do is start
working on our toppings and get any of our prep out of the way that we need to start working on. So, now 45 minutes later, So, now forty-five minutes later, and we’re going to go ahead and fold it. Our first time, I like to
use a little bit of flour on my fingers there. So, I can get the edges out. And you’re going to take one end, and you’re going to bring
it to the center like so. Then you’re going to take the next end, and pull it out and
bring that to the center. (slow music) And now, once we’ve gotten all the ends brought to the center, we’re going to take the
whole mass of dough, and we’re going to flip it over. And tuck it back in. And let it rest for another 45 minutes. So, as you’re going
through the fermentation temperature control is really important. So, try to keep it between
50 and 60 degrees Fahrenheit. So, try to keep it between fifty and sixty degrees Fahrenheit. and you’re going to be able to do that it’s just, expect a
longer fermentation time. So, moving on to our last fold. (slow music) We’re going to let it
rest for one more hour before we start our shaping process. Cover your dough and
keep it in a cool area. So we’re going to start
prepping our dough boxes. We’re going to take a sifter here, we’re going to take the
same flour, the type 85 and you really don’t want too much of a layer of
flour on your dough box. So just as little as you can, getting a nice even layer at the bottom. So, now we’re at the end of our resting and we’re going to
start shaping our dough. At the restaurant, we use a scale and we scale our bowls out to about 300 grams but if you
don’t have a scale at home, to about three-hundred
grams but if you don’t have a scale at home, I like to dust our wooden counter. Let’s dust it with the same
flour, nice and evenly. We’re going to pull our rested dough out. At this point we’re going
to kind of move quickly ’cause we also don’t want
the temperature of the dough to come back up. We’re going to take a metal bench scraper. If you don’t have a metal bench scraper, you can use the plastic dough separator, if you don’t have that
you can use a knife. So, we’re going to take
a little bit of flour and put it on our bench scraper. (slow music) A little bit of flour on our hands. Develop a ball that’s roughly
around 300 grams there. Develop a ball that’s
roughly around three-hundred grams there. take a little bit of flour and we’re going to start (scrapping) shaping our dough. And the way we’re going to do that is we’re going to take all of the exterior parts and
move them into the interior. So that way, what we have at the end of it is a nice smooth dough. Now at this point, your
hands are lightly floured. And you’re going to start kneading using the heels of your hands, to knead the dough properly inside. Don’t work the dough too much. And also, don’t let too much of the heat of your own hands go into the dough. Now that we have a nice smooth dough, we’re going to transfer it to our dough box. And we’re going to do our
second piece here the same way. (slow music) Then you put it into the dough box here, making sure that you have enough
space in between the both. This is roughly going to grow to about 1.7 to 1.8 times the size that it is now. So, think about the amount of space that you’re going to need
between the edge of the box and between the two doughs. Because if they do touch each other, it’s not the end of the world but what you’re going to
get as a misshapen pizza. You want these to grow
to be nice and circular. So that way when you’re shaping it later you have a nice even dough
that’s going to bake evenly and you can top evenly as well. Okay, so now that we’ve
gooped our pizza dough, make sure that you comment
in the section below. I’m super stoked to show
you guys the next video in which we’re going to be
making some pizza with GP. – Ooh la la, can I eat it? – Of course you can. Not bad, right? – Oh, my God. – Oh, my god. (upbeat music) (whooshing)

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